Royal Books

Seller of rare books and paper in Baltimore, specializing in cinema, music, literature, and the arts.
Diana Rigg | The Avengers | 1965
Vintage single weight black and white fashion photograph of Diana Rigg as Emma Peel, the iconic female character in the classic British television series, “The Avengers.” Here Rigg stands on a polar bear skin rug laid out near the shoreline of an unknown British locale. Shot by photographer Terry O’Neill to promote the hiring of John Bates (who worked for noted designer Jean Varon). A mimeo snipe on the verso of the photograph goes into some detail regarding Varon, Bates, and O’Neill.
Bates became Ms. Riggs’ costume designer in the second half of the show’s fourth series in January 1966. He created for the character a wardrobe of black and white op-art mod clothing and mini skirts. Prior to this then-radical shift, it was believed that lines, circles and other bold patterns would not work well with the television cameras of the day. Too, this fashion change was introduced prior to the mini skirt becoming mainstream, and weighed heavily in that fashion shift in the UK. Bates licensed his designs to several manufacturers under the Avengerswear label and these pieces were sold in various shops throughout the country. 

Diana Rigg | The Avengers | 1965

Vintage single weight black and white fashion photograph of Diana Rigg as Emma Peel, the iconic female character in the classic British television series, “The Avengers.” Here Rigg stands on a polar bear skin rug laid out near the shoreline of an unknown British locale. Shot by photographer Terry O’Neill to promote the hiring of John Bates (who worked for noted designer Jean Varon). A mimeo snipe on the verso of the photograph goes into some detail regarding Varon, Bates, and O’Neill.

Bates became Ms. Riggs’ costume designer in the second half of the show’s fourth series in January 1966. He created for the character a wardrobe of black and white op-art mod clothing and mini skirts. Prior to this then-radical shift, it was believed that lines, circles and other bold patterns would not work well with the television cameras of the day. Too, this fashion change was introduced prior to the mini skirt becoming mainstream, and weighed heavily in that fashion shift in the UK. Bates licensed his designs to several manufacturers under the Avengerswear label and these pieces were sold in various shops throughout the country. 

  1. nancyrivers reblogged this from royalbks and added:
    I wanted to be Mrs.Peel. She was the whole package and could she kick butt in great cloths,
  2. bufferlow reblogged this from royalbks
  3. royalbks posted this